Call for Stories and Photos

Call for Stories, Poems and Art

Have you had an interaction or made a connection with a living creature/plant that touched you? Would you like to share a story, a photo, a poem,  and art? Don’t be shy! All contributions great and small will be celebrated.
To see some examples from a previous  group post  see below:

Send your stories, poetry, art and a photo. Try to limit your text to 2 paragraphs (some of us may have a hard time doing that).  Send your material to:
Lawrence@oldnaturalist.com

The last day to send a story will be Friday January 21, 2022. The stories will be posted the week of January 24, 2022.

Below is an example sent in by Ken Brown

Photo by Ken Brown

I didn’t know that male and female Robins are so maternal! These two have nested on a floodlight next to my home-office window for the last three years. Both apparently forage for nesting material and food, but while his partner is building the nest, he constantly brings her nesting material and earthworms or grubs. When laying starts the mother rarely leaves the nest and the father double his food-gathering efforts. After the bright-blue eggs hatch, both parents look after the nestlings. However, after they feather, the male increases time spent tending them, I expect so the female can re-build her strength for the next laying – at least two times over a Minnesota summer. What an inspirational partnership.
Ken Brown

 

 

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2 Responses to Call for Stories and Photos

  1. Jim Ikhaml (Mr. Ike) says:

    I have been teaching kindergarten and 1st grade students from Gatewood Elementary about animal tracks. Together we can not help but get excited at every little mark we see in the snow. The best part is when these tiny people learn a few tracks and passionately pass their skill onto everyone who will listen. They don’t care that Mom or Dad had a long day. It never occurs to them that the grown ups already know what a rabbit track looks like. All they know is that they discovered something wonderful and they need to share it with the rest of the world. Get out there and pass a little something on to the next generation, the future keepers of the wild things. You won’t regret the time spent.

  2. Cheryl Smith says:

    Ice Crystals Dark Sky
    December moon ring bodes of
    looming winter storm

    Hi Larry, I always loved the programs where we took the students into the forest and wrote haiku’s. So many creative writers. I hope you and your family are well. Happy new year!

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